Is Single Page Design the Future of the Web?

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We’ve all seen websites that don’t have any sub-pages, menus or the usual, traditional hierarchical structure that many websites have. These single page designs, or pageless designs as they’re also often called, are popping up all over the place, but why?

Put simply, in the early days of the web it was usual for websites and online design to imitate print design. After all, that’s what people had been used to for hundreds of years: Separate pages for different types of content, a header at the top followed by the content, and so on. These archaic elements are finally being kicked into touch, though, as leading designers start to create websites that really innovate.

The fact is that people really don’t mind scrolling nowadays. What they don’t like is lots of clicking. We’re more than happy to scroll — you probably use ‘bottomless’ pages every day, especially if you scroll through Facebook or Twitter. Those pages don’t have bottoms, yet they’re the sites we use the most. What if you had to click on each person’s Facebook name to view their latest status? The chances are you probably wouldn’t.

Pageless designs tell a story in a logical order, rather than making you shift around the site to find out the story for yourself (and probably not in the order the designer or company who own the website intended you to). It’s easy to digest, intuitive and there’s no waiting for pages to load. The page seems less blunt, more designed and tailored to the end user and these are all enormous benefits when it comes to generating business through your website.

What’s more, these pages give much, much higher conversion rates on average. They’re shared more often on social media websites and have a much lower bounce rate. They also respond well across mobile devices and scale nicely for people using smartphones to browse the web — which most people do.

If your customers prefer it, why not give it to them? It’s also easier for you or your website design company to update as you only have one page to worry about. There’s no more worrying about menu structures and information architecture, either. Smart, pageless sites are generally much cheaper to create, load faster and force you to simplify your content (with all of the user experience and SEO benefits that brings).

It’s all food for thought, that’s for sure. Some of the statistics and studies into single page design are simply astounding, but we think that’d be better kept for another post. For now, though, it might be worth thinking about how pageless design could revolutionise your website…

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